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How onions and a baked potato became sources of botulism...

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How onions and a baked potato became sources of botulism poisoning.

Abstract: Two unlikely sources of botulism, onions and potatoes, were found to be the causes of severe outbreaks of that disease. In the case of the onions, the victims had eaten in a shopping center restaurant. The offending food was identified by investigating food eaten by other people who had eaten at the same restaurant but didn't become ill. Botulism organisms were found on the skins of onions in the storage bins at the restaurant. A check of the restaurant chef's method of preparation, followed by laboratory testing, revealed the bacteria not only survived but holding conditions permitted development of botulinal toxin. The baked potato that caused hospitalization of a 37-year old woman was a reheated baked potato in foil that had been left at room temperature overnight. (emc)

Journal Title: F.D.A. consumer.
Journal Volume/Issue: Oct 1984. v. 18 (8)
Main Author: Miller, Roger W.
Format: Article
Language: English
Subjects: botulism
foodborne illness
potatoes
onions
food spoilage
For More Info: View in NAL's Catalog.
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